January 10

A Look at CRISPR and the First Genetically-Modified Humans

Cracking Pandora’s Box – New Tools and New Frontiers In November of 2018, Chinese scientist He Jiankui revealed to the world that he had orchestrated the genetic modification and birth of two twin girls in China[1]. Psuedonymed Nana and Lulu, these newborns are the first known human babies to be born following modification of their […]

January 03

NeuWriteSD celebrates “NeuYears”!

As we begin a new year for NeuWriteSD, we’d like to reflect on our progress in 2018, as well as some of our goals (or “NeuYears Resolutions”, if you will) for 2019! NeuWriteSD celebrates 5 years 2018 marked the 5-year anniversary of NeuWriteSD’s official founding by members of the UCSD Neurosciences Graduate Program back in […]

December 27

The Trouble with Drug Development

Open a new tab, load up a science media site you know. What do you first see across the front page? You will almost certainly find a headline blaring “NEW FINDINGS SHOW AUTISM’S DAYS ARE NUMBERED” or “UNIVERSITY RESEARCHER CURES PARKINSON’S DISEASE”. Open the page up next week, and you will almost certainly see some […]

December 20

A Pirate’s Life is NOT for Me: A Deep Dive into Motion Sickness

A few months ago, I spent three and a half anxious hours on a rickety motorboat on western Tanzania’s Lake Tanganyika. The cause of my anxiety was not the fact that we were floating over the second deepest freshwater lake in the world in a boat that had already begun to take in some water […]

December 13

Astrocytes, the Underrated Stars

[En español] You usually hear the term “brain cell” referring to neurons, like they’re the only cell type present in the brain. But that’s far from the case. Neurons can be considered the main cellular unit in our nervous system, as they are the cells that transfer the information by means of electrical and chemical signals. […]

December 06

The Platypus: Sensing the Body Electric

Patti was one of my favorite Beanie Babies. Her bright magenta body and yellow webbed feet exuded a certain sunny optimism, and her strange resemblance to a flattened duck endowed her with an undeniable silliness. I remember feeling a bit confused as to whether she was a real creature or more akin to Mystic the […]

November 29

What’s in an accent?

I was born and raised in the South, but never would have described myself as having any sort of accent until I moved to Southern California. Suddenly people could figure out where I was from as soon as I opened my mouth (a fellow SoCal Southerner was correctly able to pinpoint my accent to the […]

November 22

What’s app: an insider’s perspective on how to optimize your application to grad school

(Originally published 1/17/15) With 2018 grad school application deadlines right around the corner, we thought it would be useful to repost this guide for putting together a killer grad school app. We hope it helps! Best of luck, and happy Thanksgiving! – NeuWriteSD So you’ve decided to apply to graduate school in the sciences. You’ve […]

November 15

From symptoms to biology: shifting definitions of Alzheimer’s disease

As a neuroscientist studying Alzheimer’s, I’m reminded of its far-reaching impact each time a barista, cashier, or Lyft driver makes small talk by asking what I do for a living. Unfortunately, this devastating disease needs no introduction. Considering its ubiquity, it’s surprising that a debate broke out recently among leaders in the field over the […]

November 08

Did you see that? The Mysteries of Sensory Deprivation

When I was a kid swimming in the neighbor’s pool, I loved to float on my back, eyes closed, with ears submerged so that I could only hear the muted sounds of the water around me. Though I found the experience relaxing, I also felt profoundly strange. We are constantly bombarded with sensory information from […]